Factors Associated with the Use of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Women: A New Evidence from in Surakarta, Central Java


Yulia Fitriani1,2), Ambar Mudigdo3), Rita Benya Andriani4)

1)School of Health Sciences Ganesha Husada, Kediri, East Java

2)Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret

3)Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sebelas Maret

4)School of Health Polytechnics, Surakarta

 

ABSTRACT

Background: Cervical cancer ranked fourth against most women’s cancer worldwide. The incidence of cervical cancer was estimated at 528,000 (7.9%) cases in the world causing 266,000 deaths in 2012. Cervical cancer is caused by a human papilloma-virus (HPV). The HPV vaccine can protect women from HPV infection, thus lowering the risk of cervical cancer. This study aimed to examine the factors associated with the use of HPV vaccination in women of reproductive age, using Health Belief Model.

Subjects and Method: This was a case-control study conducted at Permata Harapan Oncology Clinic, Surakarta, from January to February 2018. A total study of 200 women of reproductive age was selected by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was the use of HPV vaccination. The independent variables were knowledge, perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived barrier, perceived benefit, family income, and family support. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.

Results: The use of HPV vaccination increased with better knowledge (OR= 7.97; 95% CI= 1.50 to 42.38; p= 0.015), perceived seriousness (OR= 22.81; 95% CI= 6.06 to 85.86; p<0.001), perceived susceptibility (OR=4.03; 95%CI= 1.25 to 13.09; p=0.020), perceived benefit (OR­= 6.57; 95% CI= 1.88 to 22.98; p=0.003), family income (OR= 5.32; 95% CI= 1.57 to 18.07; p=0.007), and family support (OR= 6.86; 95% CI= 1.55 to 30.36; p=0.011). The use of HPV vaccination decreased with perceived barrier (OR= 0.14; 95% CI= 0.04 to 0.51; p=0.003).

Conclusion: HPV vaccination increases with better knowledge, perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit, family income, and family support, but decreases with perceived barrier.

Keywords: HPV vaccination, knowledge, perceived seriousness, perceived susceptibility, perceived barrier, perceived benefit, family income, family support

Correspondence: Yulia Fitriani. Masters Program in Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: yuliafitriani38@gmail.com. Mobile: 085655708946.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26911/mid.icph.2018.02.10

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