Prevalence and Factors Associated with Metabolic Syndrome among Female Batik Workers


Yayuk Hartriyanti, Hana Mutia Afifah, Perdana Samekto

 

Department of Health Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine/Public Health/Nursing, Universitas Gajah Mada

 

ABSTRACT

Background: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions, including (1) increas­ed blood pressure, (2) high blood sugar, (3) excess body fat around the waist, and (4) abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that occur together, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is closely link­ed to overweight or obesity and inactivity such as working as a batik worker. This stu­­dy aimed to estimate prevalence and to determine factors associated with me­ta­­bolic syndrome among female batik workers.

Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Kampung Ba­tik Giriloyo, Imogiri, Bantul, Yogyakarta. A total of 65 female batik workers were selected for this study. The dependent variable was metabolic syndrome. The independent variables were nutrition intake and nutrition status. Metabolic syndrome was measured by blood pressure, blood sugar, triglyceride, high den­sity lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and waist to hip ratio. To be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, one would have at least three of these risk factors. Nutrition status was measured by body mass index. The other data were collected by question­naire. The data were analyzed by chi square test with odds ratio as the mea­sure of association.

Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 18.5% among female batik wor­kers. The risk of metabolic syndrome increased with high fat intake (OR= 4.75; p= 0.030) and overweight or obesity (OR= 5.23; p= 0.002).

Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 18.5% among female batik workers. The risk of metabolic syndrome increases with high fat intake and over­­weight or obesity.

Keywords: metabolic syndrome, prevalence, risk factor, batik worker.

CorrespondenceYayuk Hartriyanti. Department of Health Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine/Public Health/Nursing, Universitas Gajah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Email: uke.mahendradhata@gmail.com. Mobile: 08129030997.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26911/theicph.2018.01.73

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