Risk Factors of Malaria Cases among Children Under Five in Bonggo Community Health Center, Sarmi, Papua Province


Lalu Irwandi1), Hari Basuki Notobroto2)

1)Epidemiology Masters Study Program, Faculty of Public Health, Universitas Airlangga

2)Department of Biostatistics and Population, Faculty of Public Health, Universitas Airlangga

 

ABSTRACT

Background: Currently in tropical and sub-tropical countries, malaria is still a world health problem of an infectious disease. In 2019, the malaria report of Sarmi Regency shows the number of malaria cases is 14,409 with 2,246 cases (15.5%) in the children under five group. This study aimed to analyze various risk factors related to the incidence of malaria among children under five in the working area of the Bonggo Community Health Center, Sarmi Regency, Papua Province.

Subjects and Method: This was a case control study conducted in Bonggo Community Health Center, Sarmi Regency, Papua Province. A total of 99 parents with children under five divided into two groups of 33 malaria cases and 66 controls (non-malaria), were enrolled in this study. The dependent variable was malaria incidence. The independent variables were parents habit, bed net, density of the residential wall, and parents’ occupation. The sampling technique used was stratified random sampling with reference to data from the E-Sismal report at Bonggo Community Health Center from April to May 2020 and the cohort for infants and children under five at the Bonggo Health Center in 2020. Data collection was carried out by observing home visits and questionnaire. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression.

Results: The habit of parents carrying their children outside the home at night increased the risk of malaria among children under five (OR= 7.05; 95% CI= 1.79 to 27.7; p= 0.005). Sleeping with insecticide-treated bed nets had a malaria protective effect on children under five (OR= 0.24; 95% CI= 0.07 to 0.78; p= 0.019). Meanwhile, the density of the residential walls (OR= 1.62; 95% CI= 0.45 to 5.86; p= 0.461) and the parents’ occupation (OR= 1.92; 95% CI= 0.56 to 6.62; p= 0.299) was not significant in influencing the incidence of malaria among children under five.

Conclusion: The habit of carrying toddlers outside the home at night increases the risk of developing malaria in children under five, while sleeping habits using insecticide-treated bed nets have a protective effect in reducing the risk of developing malaria among children under five.

Keywords: malaria, children under five, risk factors

Correspondence: Lalu Irwandi. Epidemiology Masters Study Program, Faculty of Public Health, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java. Email: irwanzlalu@gmail.com Mobile: 081354122984

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26911/the7thicph.01.11

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