The Associations of Passive Smoking, Mosquito Repellent Coil, Proximity to Industrial Area, and Family Income with Low Birth Weight in South Sumatera


Dwi Septiawati1), Bambang Wispriyono2)

1)Doctoral Program of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health,

Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

2)Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Public Health,

Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

 

ABSTRACT

 

Background: Low birth weight (LBW) remains a major issue of global public health concern with a disproportionate burden on low-and middle-income countries. LBW contributes significantly to morbidity, mortality and disability in neonatal, infancy, and childhood periods. It also has long term effects on health outcomes in adult life. This study aimed to examine the associations of passive smoking, mosquito repellent coil, proximity to industrial area, and family income with low birth weight.

Subjects and Method: This was a case control study conducted in Palembang, Ogan Ilir, Ogan Komering Ilir, Muara Enim, and Banyuasin, in South Sumatra. A sample of 300 newborns were selected for this study consisting of 100 newborns with low birth weight (cases) and 200 newborns with normal birth weight (controls).  The dependent variable was low birth weight. The independent variables were passive smoking, use of mosquito repellent coil, proximity to industrial area, and family income. The data were collected by questionnaires, and analyzed by multiple logistic regression.

Results: Passive smoking (aOR= 4.73; 95% CI= 2.02 to 10.54; p= 0.034), use of mosquito repellent coil (aOR= 2.55; 95% CI= 2.36 to 6.54; p= 0.023), proximity to industrial area (aOR= 2.44; 95% CI= 2.15 to 8.75; p= 0.002), low family income (2.79; 95% CI= 1.02 to 4.29; p= 0.046) were associated with increased risk of low birth weight, and all of these predictors were statistically significant.

Conclusion: Passive smoking, use of mosquito repellent coil, proximity to industrial area, and low family income, are significantly associated with increased risk of low birth weight.

Keywords: cigarette smoke, air pollution, family income, low birth weight.

Correspondence: Dwi Septiawati. Doctoral Program of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, Universitas Indonesia. Jl. Margonda Raya, Pondok Cina, Beji, Depok 16424, West Java. Email: dwiseptiawati@unsri.ac.id. Mobile: +6285273315600.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26911/ICPHepidemiology.FP.08.2021.05

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