Environmental Sanitation and its Correlation with Intestinal Worm Infection in Elementary School Students in West Amanuban District, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia


Wanti Wanti, Rafael Paun, Irfan Irfan, Kusmiyati Kusmiyati, Jefrin Sambara, Sisilia Leny Cahyani, Indhira Shagti, Yosephina Gunawan

 

Health Polytechnics, Ministry of Health Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

 

ABSTRACT

 

Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are still major public health problems. ntestinal parasitic infections, mainly Ascariasis, Trichiuriasis, and hookworm, are common clinical disorders in man, with resultant impairments in physical, intellectual, and cognitive development. The greater proportion of infections is associated with poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). This study aimed to examine the correlation between environmental sanitation and intestinal worm infection.

Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at elementary school students in West Amanuban, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. A sample of 160 elementary school students was selected by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was intestinal worm infection. The independent variables were poor latrine, type of latrine, poor drinking water sources, poor trash bins, poor sewerage, the presence of animals, and the presence of cages. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by Chi square.

Results: The risk of intestinal worm infection in elementary school students increased with poor latrine (OR= 6.41; 95% CI= 2.49 to 16.53; p<0.001), type of latrine (OR= 23.93; 95% CI= 5.42 to 105.71; p<0.001), poor drinking water sources (OR= 3.94; 95%CI= 1.78 to 8.71; p=0.001), poor trash bins (OR= 8.53; 95% CI= 3.93 to 18.52; p<0.001), and poor sewerage (OR= 5.25; 95% CI= 2.42 to 11.42; p<0.001). The presence of animals (OR= 1.84; 95% CI= 0.58 to 5.80; p= 0.426) and the presence of cages (OR= 2.55; 95% CI= 0.91 to 7.09; p= 0.106) were not significantly associated with intestinal worm infection.

Conclusion: The risk of intestinal worm infection in elementary school students increases with poor latrine, type of latrine, poor drinking water sources, poor trash bins, and poor sewerage. The presence of animals and the presence of cages are not signi- ficantly associated with intestinal worm infection.

 

Keywords: intestinal worms, environmental sanitation, children

Corespondence: Wanti Wanti. Health Polytechnics, Ministry of Health Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Jl. Piet A. Tallo, Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Email: trivena78- @yahoo.com. Mobile: 08113830302.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.26911/ICPHepidemiology.FP.08.2021.17

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